Flow Communications

Ghana is a fascinating West African country on the lower part of the bulge of Africa. It is known for its ancient heritage, warm climate and friendly people, and for being the first country in Africa to gain its independence after colonialism, which it obtained from Britain in 1957.

It was previously known as the Gold Coast because it is rich in gold; it is also a major producer of cocoa. Ghana is also well known for its brightly coloured fabrics, often inspired by the traditional kente cloth, a silk and cotton fabric made by interweaving cloth strips.

Three members of Flow’s team, Tara Turkington, Carina van Wyk and Kate Turkington, recently went to conduct communications and media training in the capital city, Accra, on behalf of the United States Department of State.

Read Kate’s piece, Ghana with the wind: Visit these two must-see Ghanaian sites”, featuring Tara’s pictures, for City Press.

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First view of Elmina Castle, in Ghana’s Cape Coast region and a few hours’ drive from the capital city of Accra. (Image: Tara Turkington/Flow Communications)

Elmina Castle in Ghana’s Cape Coast region was built by the Portuguese in 1482, and is one of the oldest buildings in sub-Saharan Africa.

Now a World Heritage Site, the Portuguese and then the Dutch imprisoned hundreds of thousands of slaves here before they were shipped to the Americas. It’s a haunting, sad place, and a reminder how cruel humans can be to one another. Slaves were imprisoned in the harshest conditions, and many died here. Slaves who attempted rebellion were thrown into a dungeon that was only opened after the last one had died.

In the room where hundreds of women were kept, there is still an acrid smell of humanity, hundreds of years after the last slaves were here.

Ironically, there’s a church in the centre of the castle.

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Elmina Castle was built by the Portuguese as a fort in 1482, making it the oldest building in sub-Saharan Africa. (Image: Tara Turkington/Flow Communications)
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Flow's CEO, Tara Turkington (left), and her mum, Kate Turkington (right), with Elmina Castle in the background. Kate last visited Elmina Castle in the 1960s, when she was pregnant with Tara! (Image: Carina van Wyk/Flow Communications)
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The entrance to Elmina Castle. The castle was surrounded by a double moat. (Image: Tara Turkington/Flow Communications)
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The governor’s residence, inside Elmina Castle. (Image: Tara Turkington/Flow Communications)
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Sign inside the Elmina Castle: “May humanity never again perpetrate such injustice against humanity.” (Image: Tara Turkington/Flow Communications)
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The dungeon where slaves who rebelled were left to die. (Image: Tara Turkington/Flow Communications)
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Inside the room where female slaves were kept. (Image: Tara Turkington/Flow Communications)
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The Elmina Fort, a short distance from the castle. (Image: Tara Turkington/Flow Communications)
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Kate and Carina van Wyk, part of the Flow team that went to conduct media and communications training in Ghana. (Image: Tara Turkington/Flow Communications)
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A view from Elmina Castle, looking out over the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Guinea. (Image: Tara Turkington/Flow Communications)
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Looking down on the main courtyard inside Elmina Castle, with the church in the centre. (Image: Tara Turkington/Flow Communications)
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The ramparts of Elmina Castle. (Image: Tara Turkington/Flow Communications)
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You’ll find the Kakum National Park about an hour’s drive from Elmina Castle. Here, you can walk through the top of an indigenous forest canopy on rope bridges. It’s an exciting, unusual and memorable experience. (Image: Tara Turkington/Flow Communications)
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High among the trees in the Kakum National Park. (Image: Tara Turkington/Flow Communications)
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Getting high: Kakum National Park. (Image: Tara Turkington/Flow Communications)
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Rope walkway, Kakum National Park. (Image: Tara Turkington/Flow Communications)
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Tara and Carina in Kakum National Park. (Image: Tara Turkington/Flow Communications)
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Tara and Kate shopping in the Makola Market in Accra. (Image: Carina van Wyk/Flow Communications)
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Ghana is famous for its colourful textiles, like these on sale in the Makola Market in Accra. (Image: Tara Turkington/Flow Communications)
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A friendly shopkeeper, Makola Market, Accra. (Image: Tara Turkington/Flow Communications)
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Women selling wares, Accra, Ghana. (Image: Tara Turkington/Flow Communications)
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Onion seller, Accra, Ghana. (Image: Tara Turkington/Flow Communications)
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Trainees on behalf of the United States Department of State. We thoroughly enjoyed our time working and travelling in Ghana. (Image: Flow Communications)
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