Every now and then one gets to meet someone who really stands out from the crowd, who’s making a difference in our world. Someone like Farai Chinomwe.

We had the opportunity recently to interview Farai for our client Fulcrum, which is supporting him in the very important environmental work that he does: conserving bees.

Farai Chinomwe. (Image: Fulcrum)

Farai, who’s as passionate about long-distance running as he is about bees, is well known in running circles as the guy who runs marathons backwards – which is inevitably a conversation-starter on the road, allowing him to spread his conservation message far and wide.

And it’s not just a gimmick: he’s completed the gruelling Comrades Marathon three times, as well as the Two Oceans Marathon and other races, all backwards.

The story of how Farai got into beekeeping, and then discovered he could run backwards, is a fascinating one. Click here to read the Fulcrum blog all about it.

“Running backwards has set me free, and I’ve met other people … Things that would not have happened if I was running forwards,” Farai says. “It’s changing the way people see bees – they’re no longer using pesticides, and they’re rescuing bees out of swimming pools.”

“A number of us at Fulcrum are runners, which is how we became aware of Farai,” says Fulcrum’s head of brand, Clodagh da Paixao. “It sparked my interest when I saw him and wanted to know why he was running backwards. How fascinating to find out that there’s an amazing story and journey he has been on to support bees.

“I’ve had the pleasure of meeting him in person a few times, and each time he just amazes me with his knowledge of bees, beekeeping and – most importantly – the need for education around bees, in particular in disadvantaged areas.”

In support of Farai’s work – he humanely rescues and removes bees in Johannesburg, harvests honey and trains others in beekeeping – Fulcrum has donated four hives to him.

This assistance dovetails with Fulcrum’s own environmental initiatives. The company has done away with using plastic straws and balloons for celebrations, raises awareness among its staff about environmental issues and actively recycles.

“It’s well known that bees are essential to the environment, and to human survival; without them, we cannot pollinate the crops we rely on. Advocates for bees, such as Farai, need all the help they can get, and supporting him is a natural extension of our growing environmental awareness,” says Clodagh.

If you require Farai’s beekeeping services, or you would like to also support him, please contact him on Facebook. And, of course, you could look out for him at long-distance races; he’s very easy to spot.

Farai Chinomwe on beekeeping and backwards running
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